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Recipe: Grilled Peach, Brie, Arugula and Prosciutto Flatbread

Written by Melissa Pasanen on . Posted in Recipes, Taste of the Landscape

Grilled Peach, Brie, Arugula and Prosciutto Flatbread
During the summer, William Snell fires up his outdoor oven for special events, and most Sunday evenings, to bake crisp flatbreads like this winning sweet-savory combination, which might feature peaches from Champlain Orchards in Shoreham during their brief but gorgeous season.
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Ingredients
  1. Pizza dough for one large flatbread (about 8 ounces dough)
  2. 1 large head garlic, broken into cloves and peeled
  3. 1⁄2 to 3⁄4 cup canola oil, or other light-tasting cooking oil
  4. Salt and freshly ground pepper to taste
  5. 2 medium or 3 small peaches, about 3⁄4 pound
  6. Extra virgin olive oil
  7. 1 tablespoon balsamic vinegar
  8. 2 cups (about 11⁄2 ounces) loosely packed arugula
  9. 3 slices prosciutto, torn into small ribbons
  10. 1 small (4–6 ounces) wheel Brie (or other soft, bloomy-rinded cheese), thinly sliced
  11. Up to 1 tablespoon freshly squeezed lemon juice, to taste
Instructions
  1. Prepare pizza dough if making from scratch.
  2. Place garlic cloves and enough canola oil to cover in a small saucepan over medium-low heat and bring to a simmer. Simmer until cloves are light golden brown and soft, about 7–9 minutes.
  3. Cool in oil and then remove garlic to a food processor, reserving oil. Add 2 tablespoons of reserved oil and purée garlic until smooth, adding more oil if needed. Season to taste with salt and pepper. Set aside.
  4. Light barbecue grill for medium heat. Cut peaches in half and remove pits. (No need to peel unless skin is very tough.) Brush all but one of the halves lightly with olive oil and balsamic vinegar and season with a little salt. Grill peach halves, flesh side down, until lightly charred and slightly softened but not too soft, about 5 minutes. Cool slightly and then slice into 1⁄4-inch half-moons. Dice remaining ungrilled half peach. In a small bowl, place ungrilled diced peach, arugula and prosciutto. Place garlic purée, sliced grilled peaches and sliced Brie on a tray to take out to grill.
  5. Increase grill to medium-high heat. On a well-floured surface, roll pizza dough as thin as you can, to a rough 12-inch circle. Brush one side lightly with olive oil. Grill oiled side until crisp and dark brown in spots, checking to make sure it’s not burning, although a little char can be nice. This shouldn’t take longer than 2 to 3 minutes.
  6. Take flatbread off grill and place, grilled side down, on a cookie sheet or clean flat surface. Brush uncooked side with a little oil. Flip over and spread garlic purée evenly over grilled side crust. Then arrange grilled peaches and sliced Brie evenly over crust. Transfer loaded pizza back to grill and cook, with cover down, another 2 minutes or so, until bottom is browned and cheese is melted. If crust is done before cheese has melted, move pizza off direct heat, if possible, to let cheese melt without burning crust.
  7. Remove cooked flatbread to a serving board. Toss arugula, prosciutto and fresh peaches with a little olive oil, lemon juice, salt and pepper. Use tongs to arrange arugula mixture on top of flatbread. Slice and serve immediately.
Notes
  1. Serves 3–4 as a main dish, 6–8 as an appetizer.
  2. Photographed by Ken Burris.
Adapted from Chef/Co-owner William Snell, Tourterelle Restaurant, New Haven
Adapted from Chef/Co-owner William Snell, Tourterelle Restaurant, New Haven
Vermont Life Magazine http://vermontlife.com/

Greensea’s Ben Kinnaman | Next, Summer 2016

Written by Sky Barsch on . Posted in Entrepreneurs, Q&A

Ben Kinnaman at Greensea headquarters in Richmond. Photo by Jeb Wallace-Brodeur.

Ben Kinnaman at Greensea headquarters in Richmond. Photo by Jeb Wallace-Brodeur.

Ben Kinnaman develops technology (hardware and software) that controls multimillion-dollar underwater robotic vehicles. A former diver and a historical shipwreck enthusiast, Kinnaman owns Greensea Systems, a company whose technology supports cutting-edge research in the deepest parts of the ocean, studying sunken ships, land mines, marine life and other phenomena.

VL: Why are you based in Richmond, Vt.?
BK: We are based in a tiny little town, very deliberately so, because it matches the values that me and my wife have. We decided when were were going to grow the company, it was going to be in our town and our community.

VL: How did you land here?
BK: My wife and I were doing the two-dimensional lifestyle in Baltimore, and I had been developing the concept of Greensea’s core technology. It coincided with my wife and I being in the position to think about starting a family, and we sure as hell didn’t want to do it in Washington, D.C., or Baltimore. We’d been coming to Vermont for years: hiking in the summer, leaf-peeping in the fall, skiing in the winter and everything in between. I decided to pursue this technical concept. When we moved to Vermont we hadn’t started the company, I didn’t have a job. So off we came. It was lifestyle.

VL: How would you put that lifestyle into words?
BK: The values of the community, of preserving the natural world, of being able to live and work and play. My wife and I are pretty healthy people and we value what we do with our bodies and put in our bodies. And it’s just beautiful. It’s hard to describe, it just felt good [here]. When we were visiting we would come to towns like Richmond and at 2:30 in the afternoon when school let out, we saw kids walking down the street, not a grownup in sight. And we saw families and kids out at the parks and families together up on the ski hill. And my wife and I lived a lot of places and we felt like we just didn’t see that anymore.

VL: What do you get out of the Vermont workforce?
BK: You get well-rounded people. The best tech comes from big minds, and minds who engage in all aspects of life. The best technology does not come from sitting on an interstate for two hours a day transitioning from

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